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Upcoming Webcasts

Lessons in New Ruralism

Lessons in New Ruralism

June 11, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9217391

Sponsored by: STaR Division

This session is aimed at planners interested in leading grassroots volunteer efforts in small towns and rural areas. Without the population density or professional staff of urban areas, small communities are often dependent on creative grassroots solutions for providing basic necessities such as food systems, support for those aging in place, children's programs, jobs and energy conservation. These solutions often bring together long-time residents with newer residents, generating new problem-solving ideas. The New Ruralism Initiative, a project of APA's Northern New England Chapter and Small Town and Rural Planning Division, is an on-line resource library on innovative locally-driven solutions to everyday problems faced by small towns and rural areas (https://nne.planning.org/knowledge/new-ruralism/). "Lessons in New Ruralism" was published in fall 2020 to provide an overview of twenty case studies and the lessons learned from them. This session will provide a brief overview of the New Ruralism Initiative, explore several successful case studies, and then focus on the lessons learned from twenty communities across the country as they developed creative ways to adapt to and succeed within today's economy while holding onto local values. These lessons are applicable to any grassroots project striving to improve livability in a small town or rural area.

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Local Climate Action in Oregon

Local Climate Action in Oregon

June 18, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9215902

Sponsored by: Oregon Chapter

The global climate crisis is one of the most serious threats facing us today and action must be taken at every level of government. Local planners have a key role to play in helping to mitigate climate change impacts and to ensure our communities adapt to a changing climate. In Oregon, several cities and counties have developed Climate Action Plans for reducing the generation of greenhouse gases and for addressing the potential risks and hazards that rapid climate change can pose to local communities. In this webinar, speakers from the Cities of Portland, Corvallis, and Milwaukie will share their insights into the purpose, process, and challenges of local climate action planning--including integrating climate policy into other local planning and sustainability efforts, giving extra attention to equity and social justice, and the challenges of turning plans into action.

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Parks are an Essential Business

Parks are an Essential Business

July 2, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9216782

Sponsored by: Ohio Chapter

Many cities lack adequate access to parks and trails. This equity gap has severe consequences for the health of our communities. Recognizing these inequities and developing plans and funding mechanisms to address them is critical to the future wellness and competitiveness of our cities. In addition to highlighting examples in other cities, this session will illustrate how planners in Columbus, Ohio, quantified unequitable access, set a goal of every resident to be within one half mile of a park or trail, and developed a targeted strategic land acquisition plan. Equitable access to parks and trails in our communities is critical to understand, document and address. Participants will learn about assessment methods to quantify equitable access and solutions to ensure that everyone has walkable access to parks and trails.

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Coming Soon!

Coming Soon!

July 9, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #TBD

Sponsored by: Technology Division

Street Commerce: The Hidden Structure of Retail Location Patterns and Vibrant Sidewalks

Street Commerce: The Hidden Structure of Retail Location Patterns and Vibrant Sidewalks

July 16, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9216783

Sponsored by: Urban Design and Preservation Division

Street commerce has gained prominence in urban areas, where demographic shifts such as increasing numbers of single people and childless "empty nesters," along with technological innovations enabling greater flexibility of work locations and hours, have changed how people shop and dine out. Contemporary city dwellers are demanding smaller-scale stores located in public spaces that are accessible on foot or by public transit. At the same time, the emergence of online retail undermines both the dominance and viability of big-box discount businesses and drives brick and mortar stores to focus as much on the experience of shopping as on the goods and services sold. The COVID19 pandemic has further exacerbated the problems retailers already faced, but also opened up new opportunities. In light of such trends, street commerce will play an important role in twenty-first-century cities, particularly in producing far-reaching benefits for the environment and local communities. Although street commerce is deeply intertwined with myriad contemporary urban visions and planning goals—walkability, quality of life, inclusion, equity, and economic resilience—it has rarely been the focus of systematic research and informed practice. Drawing on economic theory, urban design principles, regulatory policies, and merchant organization models, Andres Sevtsuk’s book conceptualizes key problems and offers innovative solutions on street commerce, providing a range of examples from around the world to detail how different cities and communities have bolstered and reinvigorated their street commerce. According to Sevtsuk, equitable and successful street commerce can only be achieved when the private sector, urban policy makers, planners, and the public are equipped with the relevant knowledge and tools to plan and regulate it.

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Urban Planning in a COVID-19 World: Part 2

Urban Planning in a COVID-19 World: Part 2

July 23, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9216784

Sponsored by: National Capital Area Chapter

This webinar will continue and update the webinar with the same title from July of 2020. As the United States begins to emerge from the worst impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic, the panelists, experts in transportation, public participation and land use; will discuss how the profession of urban planning has profoundly changed in the last 18 months. This panel will also discuss lessons learned with respect to racial justice, police reform, systemic racism, transportation planning and public education. This panel will also look back on how much our society as a whole has changed over the last 18 months and ways that planning can have a positive impact on how the nation’s recovery from Covid-19.

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Previous Webcasts

Public Art Life Cycle Part 2: Maintenance to Mayhem

Public Art Life Cycle Part 2: Maintenance to Mayhem

January 15, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM # 9203436

Sponsored by: Urban Design & Preservation Division

This second presentation in a two-part series will begin post-installation. We will look at best practices and federal and state laws pertaining to the maintenance and conservation of public art works. The presentation will focus on how communities and public art programs address issues of retaining, repairing, relocating, and removing public art. From current court cases challenging the application of the Visual Artists Rights Act to street art, to the heated debates raging over the removal of monuments, we will explore the hot topics challenging public art programs and making newspaper headlines. The presentation will last approximately one hour with at least 30 minutes for questions and answers.

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Harnessing the Power of Community Feedback with a Qualitative Methodology

Harnessing the Power of Community Feedback with a Qualitative Methodology

January 22, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9211094

Sponsored by: Massachusetts Chapter

Integrating qualitative practices into planning work also can help support more inclusive planmaking and account for important and persistent inequities present in quantitative data by surfacing the rich, unique, and varied lived experiences of marginalized communities, who in addition to being undercounted in quantitative data, are often excluded from formal decision-making structures and institutions. Ineffective collection and analysis of community feedback can lead to biased conclusions and alienate community members. Adopting a qualitative methodology in your project can help you address these risks, improve your work, and nurture stronger relationships with stakeholders. In this session, the speakers will present an overview of a qualitative methodology for planning and share tools for developing a coherent and practical methodology to collect, analyze, and incorporate qualitative data into your projects. This session’s speakers will draw on their extensive experience with community-based qualitative practices, as well as their diverse personal and professional backgrounds, to share how they approach working with a qualitative methodology in their own work and the impact it has on their projects. Attendees will leave this session understanding how to incorporate a qualitative methodology into their work and projects.

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Resilience in Vulnerable Communities: When Climate Change Forces Relocation

Resilience in Vulnerable Communities: When Climate Change Forces Relocation

January 29, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9210770

Sponsored by: Housing & Community Development Division

This two-part series will explore three situations of vulnerable communities adapting to and surviving the threats of climate change and urban development and present planning best practices. First, Sally Russell Cox with the State of Alaska will share her work with four communities and the reports she co-authored on a relocation framework and the unmet infrastructure needs of Alaska Native villages due to erosion, flooding, and permafrost thaw. Then, Pat Forbes with the State of Louisiana, will describe the Isle de Jean Charles project. This marsh island has lost 98% of its land due to sea level rise and coastal land loss, which is forcing the resettlement of the community that inhabited that land for generations. The speakers will demonstrate how citizen participation is critical to the relocation and cultural preservation and describe how interagency collaboration is critical to ensure housing affordability and infrastructure planning. This is the first of a two-part series looking at resilience in vulnerable communities. The second part will look at the Gullah-Geechee community and their resilience in the face of urban development encroachment. This webcast is hosted by the APA Housing & Community Development Division

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The Shame of Chicago: The Color Tax Screening

The Shame of Chicago: The Color Tax Screening

February 12, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9210528

Sponsored by: Housing & Community Development Division

The APA Housing and Community Development Division is excited to host a screening of Episode III in the documentary series, the Shame of Chicago - The Color Tax. Premiering last year at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, The Color Tax tells the story of how a system of predatory home contract sales during the 1950s and 60s plundered enormous sums of wealth from the pockets of black families seeking homeownership. But unlike what happened in other cities, Chicago’s families fought back in one of city’s most heart-wrenching and perilous campaigns for racial and economic justice. Reverend William Barber, co-director of the National Poor People’s Campaign, A National Call for Moral Revival writes, “The Color Tax paints with vivid clarity perhaps America's most striking example of systemic racism.” After the screening there will be a moderated discussion around fair housing, exclusionary housing policies and the impacts on minority communities nationwide.

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Resilience in Vulnerable Communities

Resilience in Vulnerable Communities

February 19, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9211328

Sponsored by: Housing & Community Development Division

The APA Housing and Community Development Division is exited to host the second part of our series on Resilience in Vulnerable Communities. Hilton Head Island’s population was predominately Gullah Geechee people for generations until a bridge brought development in 1956. Because of this new development Gullah Geechee people were forced out due to rising land, housing, and tax costs. A Gullah Geechee Land and Cultural Preservation Task Force was created to preserve their culture and the result of their work included 37 policy recommendations. Strategies to address cultural preservation, land management, heirs’ property and community development were included. Sheryse DuBose, with the Town of Hilton Head will discuss how the Gullah Geechee people were instrumental in this major planning project and their plan to retain the community fabric when the native community is actively leaving. The speakers will describe the zoning measures being considered to ensure the community has access to land and the programs that exist to arrest land sales for heirs’ property.

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Suburban Design in a New Era

Suburban Design in a New Era

March 5, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9212129

Sponsored by: Illinois Chapter

Join us for a webcast hosted by the Illinois Chapter of the American Planning Association and the Municipal Design Review Network (MDRN), where attendees will learn about design strategies and amenities that the suburbs are embracing for healthier and more dynamic spaces. Hear how research has led to such strategies, and learn from experts on how suburban communities are adapting spatially in this new era.

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Legacy Businesses: Emerging Directions

Legacy Businesses: Emerging Directions

March 12, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9212476

Sponsored by: Urban Design & Preservation Division

Across North America, especially in rapidly growing communities, the public laments the demise of quirky, independent enterprises -- the long standing barbers, bakeries and bookstores that have created and sustained a sense of place for generations. Unfortunately, planners have few tools to promote or preserve these community institutions. Following the pioneering example of San Francisco (and a handful of international initiatives), communities have started exploring legacy business programs, which range from simple documentation to marketing campaigns to technical assistance programs to grants and incentives. Legacy business programs are also part of a movement to address the “diversity deficit” in the preservation field. Practitioners increasingly call for new ways to document and promote intangible culture (rather than merely architecture) and utilize new media to spread “living history;” foster inclusion and “social sustainability;" broaden the constituency for historic preservation; and ensure that vernacular and underrepresented heritage is not lost. Planners and advocates from San Francisco, San Antonio, TX and Cambridge, MA will talk about different approaches to identifying, documenting and promoting legacy businesses in their communities. The session will also include highlights from a study of similar initiatives across North America conducted by Dr. Elizabeth Morton detailing the criteria; scope; engagement strategies; and policy tools used.

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The Road to AICP

The Road to AICP

March 19, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9212130

Sponsored by: Women and Planning Division

Do you have doubts about becoming AICP certified? Are you a student thinking about a career in planning wanting to learn more about the AICP certification process? Are you planning to take the upcoming AICP exam? This webinar is for you! The American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) is the only nationwide verification of a planners’ expertise. In 2019, only 36% of APA members held the AICP certification. There are noticeable advantages to obtaining a professional certification like increased earning potential and competitive advantages in the job market. There are also barriers to entry for many qualified planners like annual dues and costs associated with continuing education. Join the APA Women & Planning Division for an informative panel discussion about the advantages & disadvantages of the AICP certification, how to apply for the exams, and some basic test tips for future test takers.

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Github for Planners

Github for Planners

March 26, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9212996

Sponsored by: APA Technology Division

Many existing trends of digitalization in planning have been accelerated during the pandemic. The importance of software and data in planning have taken a new meaning as cities look to do everything from leveraging AI to managing their curbs. When we hear "Data is the new oil" or "Code is the new concrete", understanding how the refineries and mixers operate might be a good idea. GitHub is a widely used distributed collaboration platform in the tech industry, as a tool for knowledge sharing, software development,  and collaboration. David Wasserman, Data Science Practice Lead at Alta Planning & Design and Marshall Ballard, Associate at Fehr & Peers, will provide some background information on Git & GitHub and how planners can use them through a short demo of APA Technology Division's new planning-technology-resources Github Repository and how you can get involved. Q&A will follow.

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Architecture and Urban Planning in Southeast Asia, South America and East Africa

Architecture and Urban Planning in Southeast Asia, South America and East Africa

April 9, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9212475

Sponsored by: APA National Capital Area Chapter + APA International Division

This session discusses architecture and urban planning outside of North America and Western Europe

 

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Design Thinking – Utilizing Hand Graphics to Explore Ideas

Design Thinking – Utilizing Hand Graphics to Explore Ideas

April 16, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9214000

Sponsored by: Urban Design and Preservation Division

Drawing is a form of communication that builds community and bridges culture. The intent of the presentation is to initiate a dialogue regarding the importance of hand sketching to explore ideas. From the earliest days, humans have relied on illustrations, hieroglyphs and diagrams to communicate important aspects of life. The ability to draw is essential for non-verbally communication and it contributes to social understanding. However, drawing well does not always equate to good communication or even good design. So, how important is drawing in the process of design. Does drawing matter? In my opinion Drawing Really Matters. We will challenge what it means to be a designer and the attributes of a good designer in our context of illustrating ideas. To be clear, this is not about just learning how to draw…but using graphics representation to stretch your creative energy. So, let’s go forward and explore ideas that positively contribute to the good life.

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Planning for Infrastructure Resilience: From Aging Infrastructure to Climate Change

Planning for Infrastructure Resilience: From Aging Infrastructure to Climate Change

April 30, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9214033

Sponsored by: HMDR Division

What is the planner’s role in infrastructure resilience? How can planners, in partnership with the whole community, ensure that a community’s infrastructure – often managed by different private, public, and quasi-public organizations – is regularly maintained and that risks posed by climate change are reduced or eliminated? PAS Report 596: Planning for Infrastructure Resilience tackles many of these tough questions. Join us for a panel discussion where APA’s Joseph DeAngelis will take a deep dive into the PAS report, focusing on the key planning tools for infrastructure resilience and how planners can navigate infrastructure financing and planning in deep uncertainty. Mark Reiner will discuss the planner’s role in characterizing when the chronic disruptions of aging urban infrastructure should be considered as hazards, and therefore, a threat to urban resilience. He will also share insights on an infrastructure assessment tool – Whole Infrastructure Systems for Resilient Development (WISRD). Finally, a local official will share insights on how they have advanced some of these concepts, such as the integration of sea level rise data into infrastructure planning.

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Get Ready: 5 trends that will change your community, and how to adapt

Get Ready: 5 trends that will change your community, and how to adapt

May 14, 2021 | 1:00 - 2:30 PM ET

CM #9215901

Sponsored by: Ohio Chapter

This session takes a big step back to look at hidden demographic and economic changes unfolding right now. We will look at how places and people are being transformed by forces we often don’t see, and how those transformations are inadvertently in conflict with The Way We Do Things. We will look at significant challenges facing communities and their planners as a result of these trends, and outline how our work may need to evolve.

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