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November 1, 2017
5:30-7:30PM

Compact Development and Driving Reduction: Where to Densify in Oslo

Knowlton Hall, Gui Auditorium

As part of the Baumer Lecture series at the Ohio State University, Jason Cao, a Professor in Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, will be visiting OSU to present on his recent study on compact development and driving reduction in Oslo.


Although many studies have explored the relationship between the built environment and travel behavior, the literature offers limited evidence about the collective influence of built environment attributes, and their non-linear effects on travel. This lecture will present a study that innovatively adopts gradient boosting decision trees to fill the gaps. Using the case of Oslo, Norway, we apply this method to the data on both weekdays and weekends to illustrate the differential effects of built environment characteristics on driving distance. We found that they have a stronger effect on weekdays than weekends. On weekdays, their collective influence is larger than that of demographics. Furthermore, they show salient non-linear effects on driving distance, challenging the linearity assumption commonly adopted in the literature. This lecture will introduce the transportation planning experience of identifying effective ranges of distance to different centers and population density, and highlights the important role of sub-centers in driving reduction. In particular, it is recommended that densification should occur within 12 km from the city center.

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2017-11-01 17:30:00 2017-11-01 19:30:00 America/Detroit Compact Development and Driving Reduction: Where to Densify in Oslo As part of the Baumer Lecture series at the Ohio State University, Jason Cao, a Professor in Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, will be visiting OSU to present on his recent study on compact development and driving reduction in Oslo. Although many studies have explored the relationship between the built environment and travel behavior, the literature offers limited evidence about the collective influence of built environment attributes, and their non-linear effects on travel. This lecture will present a study that innovatively adopts gradient boosting decision trees to fill the gaps. Using the case of Oslo, Norway, we apply this method to the data on both weekdays and weekends to illustrate the differential effects of built environment characteristics on driving distance. We found that they have a stronger effect on weekdays than weekends. On weekdays, their collective influence is larger than that of demographics. Furthermore, they show salient non-linear effects on driving distance, challenging the linearity assumption commonly adopted in the literature. This lecture will introduce the transportation planning experience of identifying effective ranges of distance to different centers and population density, and highlights the important role of sub-centers in driving reduction. In particular, it is recommended that densification should occur within 12 km from the city center. Knowlton Hall, Gui Auditorium